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HP 3D Printers - Reinvent Everything

HP Launches World’s Most Advanced Metals 3D Printing Technology for Mass Production to Accelerate 4th Industrial Revolution

Source: HP Press Center

September 10,2018

 Metal Jet

HP Metal Jet up to 50x more productive, delivering low-cost, high-quality final parts; 
New Metal Jet Production Service opens up world of applications to global customers;
Partnerships with GKN Powder Metallurgy, Parmatech, Volkswagen, Wilo and more

News highlights:

  • New HP Metal Jet technology delivers mechanically functional final parts with up to 50x more productivity than other 3D printing methods and at significantly lower cost compared to other binder jetting systems
  • Metal Jet Production Service to fill orders for production-grade final parts beginning in 2019
  • HP Jet Fusion 3D 300/500 series enables concept prototyping as well as short-run production for end-use products
  • Reinventing factory production for auto, industrial, and medical industries; New partnerships with GKN Powder Metallurgy and Parmatech to produce Metal Jet parts for Volkswagen, Wilo, and more

Chicago and Palo Alto, CA – September 10, 2018 — Today at the 2018 International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS), HP Inc. launched HP Metal Jet, the world’s most advanced 3D printing technology for the high volume manufacturing of production-grade metal parts. Providing up to 50 times more productivity1 at a significantly lower cost2 than other 3D printing methods, HP Metal Jet is being deployed by manufacturing leaders GKN Powder Metallurgy and Parmatech for the factory production of final parts. Customers placing orders include global stalwarts Volkswagen and Wilo and innovative vertical market leaders such as Primo Medical Group and OKAY Industries.

As part of its mission to transform the way the world designs and manufactures, HP today also launched the Metal Jet Production Service3, enabling customers around the world to rapidly iterate new 3D part designs, produce final parts in volume, and integrate HP Metal Jet into their long-term production roadmaps.

HP Metal Jet is a groundbreaking, voxel-level binder jetting technology leveraging more than 30 years of HP printhead and advanced chemistries innovation. With a bed size of 430 x 320 x 200mm, 4x the nozzle redundancy and 2x the printbars4, and significantly less binder by weight, HP Metal Jet delivers greater productivity5 and reliability at a low acquisition and operational cost6 compared to other metals 3D printing solutions. HP Metal Jet will start with stainless steel finished parts, delivering isotropic properties that meet or exceed ASTM and MPIF Standards7.

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Siemens and HP are expanding innovation for
Industrial 3D printed parts with full color.

Source: HP Press Center

6/4/2018

Siemens and HP Color 3D Printed Surgical Cutting Guide

Siemens and HP are expanding innovation for industrial 3D printed parts with full color. For example, personalized surgical instruments can be produced by 3D printing with unique ID, both human and machine readable.

News highlights:

  • Industry leaders expand strategic partnership, extending technology alignment for next-generation products that are 3D printed in full color
  • Expansion of Siemens’ additive design and manufacturing software to support HP’s new full-color 3D printers
  • HP Jet Fusion 3D 300/500 series enables concept prototyping as well as short-run production for end-use products
  • Addition of HP Multi Jet Fusion 3D printing technology to Siemens’ Additive Manufacturing Experience Center in Erlangen, Germany

Phoenix – June 4, 2018 — Today at Siemens PLM Connection Americas 2018, one of the largest events for Siemens’ PLM software users, HP Inc. and Siemens expanded their longstanding collaboration to enable even more advanced functionality across a broader set of Siemens PLM software to change the way users can design and manufacture with HP’s Multi Jet Fusion 3D printing technology.

Siemens’ NX and Solid Edge Software deliver support for Full-Color 3D Printing Capabilities through HP Multi Jet Fusion

 With the latest releases, Siemens, a leader in digital innovation software, and HP, the global industry leader in 3D printing, will enable users of Siemens’ NX™ software and Solid Edge® software to design and produce full color 3D-printed parts. HP’s Jet Fusion 3D 300/500 series is the industry’s first 3D printing solution for the production of engineering-grade, functional parts in full color, black or white – with voxel-level control – in a fraction of the time of other solutions.

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Pepsi Chooses HP 3D Printing

Source: All3DP Magazine

By Hanna Watkin

5/29/2018

PL CS BlackPanther Image 1

In a unique marketing campaign for the superhero movie Black Panther, Pepsi partnered up with the manufacturing service provider Protolabs to create a collectibles kit that featured five special edition soda cans fitted with 3D printed Black Panther masks. 

Right in the nick of time for the last month’s premier of the renowned superhero film Black Panther, Pepsi enlisted the help of Protolabs to 3D print a limited-edition promotional collector’s item. The kit, which features five cans that represent each of the movie’s main characters, is fitted with a special 3D printed Black Panther mask.

Aiming to develop and produce 250 complex masks as quickly as possible, Pepsi decided that creating molds would be too expensive. Therefore, they turned to the professional-grade 3D printing service provider Protolabs to create the detailed designs.

“Much of this kit was inspired by the costumes and characters from the movie. This was an exciting opportunity for us to incorporate new technologies to develop unique textures, graphics, dimensional elements, and lighting to bring the kit to life,” says Andrew Phinney, an R&D packaging engineer at PepsiCo.

Testing 3D Printing Processes for the Perfect Pepsi Panther Mask

The team considered using a number of 3D printing technologies, including SLS, SLA, PolyJet, CLIP technology from Carbon and Multi Jet Fusion, but finally settled on just a couple to actualize their unique concept.

At first, they utilized fused deposition modeling (FDM) machines to create the initial prototypes of the masks. They added some modifications to ensure that the design worked with the picture on the can and that it would remain secure during shipping. For the final product, Multi Jet Fusion technology was used to create the final parts.

As the flagship technology for HP’s impressive 3D printer line, Multi Jet Fusion was chosen due to its ability to provide a high quality surface finish and resolution, while also keeping production prices relatively low.

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HP Showcases Growth in High-Volume 3D Printing Deployments and Breakthrough Applications for Manufacturing

Source: HP Press Center

5/22/2018

Growth in High Volume 3D Printing

Protolabs, IAM 3D Hub, Materialise, and ZiggZagg embrace HP’s Multi Jet Fusion for digital manufacturing; new applications for the Pontifical Swiss Guard, PepsiCo, auto racing, orthotics, industrial machinery, and more.

News highlights:

  • Protolabs upgrades seven HP systems to the Jet Fusion 4210 3D printing platform in the U.S. and Germany offering customers truly global digital production services
  • IAM 3D Hub in Spain deploys eight HP Jet Fusion 4200 3D printers; ZiggZagg in Belgium installs six HP Jet Fusion 4210 3D printing systems to meet growing demand for production-grade 3D printed parts
  • Long-standing HP customer Materialise demonstrates the power of HP’s end-to-end 3D solutions with production of custom insoles
  • New breakthrough applications across vertical industries demonstrate power of HP Multi Jet Fusion platform

Barcelona, Spain - May 22, 2018 — Today at the HP Innovation Summit in Barcelona, Spain, HP announced expanded installations of its HP Jet Fusion 3D printing solutions with digital manufacturing innovators Protolabs, Materialise, and ZiggZagg. As a leader in helping the world take advantage of digital technologies in the 4th Industrial Revolution, HP also showcased its collaboration with the International Additive Manufacturing (IAM) 3D Hub and highlighted numerous applications of 3D printing in action, including new lighter-weight helmets for the Pontifical Swiss Guard, custom merchandising for PepsiCo, airflow manifolds for high-performance auto racing, industrial machinery used in the construction of skyscrapers, and orthosis devices improving the quality of life for patients, amongst others.

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Vatican's Swiss Guard Trades In Metal Helmets for 3D Printed Ones

Source: 3DPRINT.COM

by Clare Scott

5/7/2018

Vatican's Swiss GuardVatican's Swiss Guard
[Image: Franco Origlia/Getty Images]

The Swiss Guard has been in existence for centuries, serving as the Vatican’s private army. They have served over 40 popes and are steeped in tradition, including the red, blue and yellow Gala Uniform they wear – the colors of the Medici family. The uniform includes a helmet stamped with the crest of Pope Julius II, known as the “mercenary pope,” who founded the small army in 1506. Made from sheet steel, the helmet bears a feathered crest for formal occasions.

However, some of the guards had complained of burns from the steel helmets heating up in the sun. So it was time for a change, and the Swiss Guard recently announced that it would be replacing the metal helmets with plastic ones, 3D printed from an impact-resistant, weather-resistant PVC plastic. The material will keep the guards’ heads cool on sunny days, not only because of the lighter, less heat-attractive material but because ventilation channels have been integrated inside the helmets’ shells. Swiss Guard spokesman Sgt. Urs Breitenmoser noted that the ceremonial helmets, which serve no defensive purpose, are intended to be worn for papal masses and state visits.

The helmets were designed using a 3D scan of the original 16th century design, then 3D printed in one piece. Each helmet costs about €880, half the price of the original metal versions. Production time is greatly shortened, too – it took about 100 hours to make the traditional forged version of a helmet, while the 3D printed versions take only about 14 hours.

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3D Printing Set to Revolutionize Mainstream Manufacturing

Source: Huffington Post

By Vala Afshar, Contributor

12/11/2017 04:31 pm ET

Getty

According to Gartner, 3D printing has great potential. Total spending is predicted to grow at a 66.5% CAGR to $17.7 billion in 2020, with over 6.5 million printer sales. Gartner also predicts that “by 2020, 75% of manufacturing operations worldwide will use 3D-printed tools, jigs and fixtures made in-house or by a service bureau to produce finished goods. Also, 3D printing will reduce new product introduction timelines by 25%.” Enterprise 3D printer shipments is also expected to grow 57.4% CAGR through 2020.

The top priorities related to 3D printing include accelerated product development, offering customized products and limited series and increasing production flexibility. Here are additional 3D printing market forecasts:

  • 57% of all 3D printing work done is in the first phases of the new product development
  • 55% of companies predict they will be spending more in 3D printing services and solutions in 2017
  • 47% of companies surveyed have seen a greater ROI on their 3D printing investments in 2017 compared to 2016

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Jabil Prints Parts for HP’s 3D Printer

Source: Plastics News

By Clare Goldsberry

December 11, 2017

Using a 3D printer to produce parts for a 3D printer is just one example of how far the additive manufacturing industry has come over the past three decades. That’s what manufacturing solutions provider Jabil (St. Petersburg, FL) is doing for HP Inc. (Palo Alto, CA), which is rapidly scaling its 3D printer business. The primary benefit of 3D printing is faster time to market and a dramatic cost reduction in parts, which includes the cost of having to build molds and perform multiple design iterations.

HP Multi Jet Fusion systemHP's Multi Jet Fusion 3-D printing system.

Jabil currently uses HP’s Multi Jet Fusion (MJF) 3D-printing technology to produce 50 tested and validated parts for HP printers. This has enabled the company to achieve break-even points at up to 40,000 units on some parts, while completing 18 design iterations in the time it normally takes to make one prototype. Production 3D printing of plastic components is the goal for many OEMs, but Jabil and HP seem to be making major headway in this effort.

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HP Goes After Injection Molding with Boosted Efforts in 3D Printing

Source: Plastics News

By Audrey Laforest

December 4, 2017

HP 3D PrintersHP Inc. has boosted its presence in additive manu-
facturing by expanding its portfolio of 3D printers.
Detroit — Can 3D printing compete on the same manufacturing level as injection molding? HP Inc.'s David Woodlock thinks it can — eventually.

Woodlock, who handles market development for 3D printing at the company's offices in Vancouver, Wash., spoke Nov. 8 at the 2017 Design in Plastics conference about HP's ongoing efforts to grow additive manufacturing into a $12 trillion manufacturing market.

"How do we get out of [3D printing] being 'I can make one part and two parts' into 'I can make 1,000 parts. I can make 10,000 parts. I can make a million parts?'" he asked the audience.

Woodlock said it is something HP and other industry stakeholders are going to have to figure out because "it's not really happening today."

"The way we're figuring it out is we are trying, we are learning," he said. "We're failing a lot, but really, most importantly, we're learning from our customers."

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